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Urology, also known as genitourinary surgery, is the branch of medicine that focuses on the surgical and medical diseases of the male and female urinary tract system and themale reproductive organs. The organs under the domain of urology include the kidneys, adrenal glands, ureters, urinary bladder, urethra, and the male reproductive organs (testes, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate andpenis).

The urinary and reproductive tracts are closely linked, and disorders of one often affect the other. Thus a major spectrum of the conditions managed in urology exists under the domain of genitourinary disorders. Urology combines the management of medical (i.e., non-surgical) conditions such as urinary tract infections and benign prostatic hyperplasia, with the management of surgical conditions such as bladder or prostate cancer, kidney stones, congenital abnormalities, traumatic injury, and stress incontinence.

Urology has traditionally been on the cutting-edge of surgical technology in the field of medicine; including minimally invasive robotic and laparoscopic surgery, laser assisted surgeries, and a host of other unique scope-guided-procedures. Urologists are well-trained in open and minimally-invasive techniques, employing real-time ultrasound guidance, fiber-optic endoscopic equipment, and various lasers in the treatment of multiple benign and malignant conditions. In addition, urologists are pioneers in the use of robotics in laparoscopic surgery. A comprehensive urology department taking care of all urology conditions in males as well as in females with world class endoscopy instruments. Urology is closely related to (and urologists often collaborate with the practitioners of) the medical fields of oncology, nephrology, gynaecology, andrology, pediatric surgery, colorectal surgery,gastroenterology, and endocrinology.

Services Offered

  • Cystoscopy with retrograde catheter unilateral.
  • Cystoscopy with retrograde catheter bilateral
  • Uroflometry
  • TURP, TURBT, URS, PCNL etc.
  • Cystoscopy diagnosis
  • Dilatation of urethra
  • DJ setting
  • DJ removal

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Features of this department:

  • Fully equipped to treat Cancer of the female and male Gento -Urinary tract including Radiotherapy and chemotherapy
  • Female Urology like stress incontinence
  • Treatment for Paediatric Urological conditions
  • Reconstructive Urology
  • Special Clinics like Stone Clinic, Prostrate Clinic
  • Renal Transplant
  • State of the art Urodynamics diagnostic test for dysfunctional bladder and lower urinary symptoms
  • Laparoscopic Procedures
  • Cadaver and Live related kidney transplant.
  • Live related and Cadaver kidney transplant.
  • Management of infertility and sexual dysfunctions.
  • All diagnostic blood and urine tests.

Haemodialysis

Haemodialysis, a machine filters wastes, salts and fluid from your blood when your kidneys are no longer healthy enough to do this work adequately. Haemodialysis is the most common way to treat advanced kidney failure. The procedure can help you carry on an active life despite failing kidneys.

Knowledge Center


When is dialysis needed?
You need dialysis if your kidneys no longer remove enough wastes and fluid from your blood to keep you healthy. This usually happens when you have only 10 to 15 percent of your kidney function left. You may have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, swelling and fatigue. However, even if you don’t have these symptoms yet, you can still have a high level of wastes in your blood that may be toxic to your body. Your doctor is the best person to tell you when you should start dialysis.

How does haemodialysis work?
In haemodialysis, a dialysis machine and a special filter called an artificial kidney, or a dialyzer, are used to clean your blood. To get your blood into the dialyzer, the doctor needs to make an access, or entrance, into your blood vessels. This is done with minor surgery, usually to your arm. For more information on haemodialysis access.

How does the dialyzer clean my blood?
The dialyzer, or filter, has two parts, one for your blood and one for a washing fluid called dialysate. A thin membrane separates these two parts. Blood cells, protein and other important things remain in your blood because they are too big to pass through the membrane. Smaller waste products in the blood, such as urea, creatinine, potassium and extra fluid pass through the membrane and are washed away.

Where is haemodialysis done?
Haemodialysis can be done in a hospital, in a dialysis center that is not part of a hospital or at home. You and your doctor will decide which place is best, based on your medical condition, and your wishes.

How long will each haemodialysis treatment last?
In a dialysis center, haemodialysis is usually done 3 times per week for about 4 hours at a time. People who choose to do haemodialysis at home may do dialysis treatment more frequently, 4-7 times per week for shorter hours each time.